Meet the Team

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SHARC Executive Committee, Dr. Robert Cook, Dr. Maria Jose Miguez, Dr. Kendall Bryant, Dr. Babette Brumback and Dr. Seema Desai

SHARC Executive Committee, Dr. Robert Cook, Dr. Maria Jose Miguez, Dr. Kendall Bryant, Dr. Babette Brumback and Dr. Seema Desai

The Southern HIV Alcohol Research Consortium (SHARC) held the first Research Symposium in Gainesville to showcase research on HIV and Alcohol hosted by SHARC Director Robert Cook October 2012.

The symposium presenters discussed alcohol consumption associated with significant behavioral and biological outcomes in persons with HIV infection.  As Florida has the highest rate of newly-diagnosed HIV infections in the U.S.  Its epidemic is characterized by significant racial disparities and high-risk populations including men who have sex with men.  However, few effective strategies exist to help persons with HIV to reduce their drinking.

The symposium prsesenters were:

Kendall J. Bryant, Ph.D., Director, HIV/AIDS Research, NIAAA
Scientific Collaborator, Consortia for HIV/AIDS and Alcohol Research Translation (CHAART)
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

William W. Lattimer, Ph.D., M.P.H., Professor and Chair
Department of Clinical and Health Psychology
University of Florida

Jeffrey Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor and PhD Program Director
Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy
University of Florida

Ronald Cohen, Ph.D., Professor, Departments of Aging-Geriatric Research, Neurology, & Psychiatry
Director, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory, University of Florida Institute on Aging

SHARC

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Alcohol consumption is associated with significant behavioral and biological outcomes in persons with HIV infection.  However, few effective strategies exist to help persons with HIV to reduce their drinking. Moreover, few studies involving alcohol and HIV have been sufficiently powered to make conclusions in women.

Florida has the highest rate of newly-diagnosed HIV infections in the US. Its epidemic is characterized by significant racial disparities and high-risk populations including men who have sex with men.

The Southern HIV Alcohol Research Consortium (SHARC) was formed in 2011 by linking three separate NIAAA-funded research proposals involving HIV and high-risk alcohol consumption, including an existing cohort of over 700 persons with HIV in Miami, Florida.

Potential Impact of SHARC

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  • Maximize overall research productivity related to alcohol and HIV infection.
  • Increase capacity to conduct clinical trials.
  • Enhance multidisciplinary and public health collaborations.
  • Support new researchers and trainees.
  • Implement findings into clinical practice and public health settings and improve health outcomes in persons with HIV and high-risk alcohol consumption.
  • Translate research findings into applied clinical and public health settings, while building collaborations with public health clinics serving persons with HIV in Florida.
  • Transform treatment of harmful drinking in settings providingprimary care for HIV infection, with a range of practical intervention strategies targeting behaviors and biologic endpoints.
  • Focus on alcohol’s potential impact on chronic disease outcomes including cognitive functioning, immune senescence, and quality of life.
  • Evaluate health services and health system factors that may influence the delivery of effective interventions for harmful drinking.